Blog

Welcome to Dillon Toyota Lift's blog. Here you will find everything from product features, industry education, operator insights, material handling solutions, safety, trends, best practices and more!  

 

Mar 31

Building a forklift that works perfectly for every application can be challenging. After all, what works for a small mom and pop retail store may not work as well for a high-throughput forging application. Options such as lights and attachments allow you to customize each forklift to fit your needs, but did you know that adjusting forklift settings can be just as critical to optimizing performance and efficiency?

Many forklifts today come standard with pre-set performance and operational settings that can be adjusted either through a built-in multi-function display or an external device such as a laptop. Toyota’s Core Electric and 3-Wheel Electric models, for example, each have over 60 different settings that can be fine-tuned through the display. These settings are protected via passwords to prevent access to unauthorized users.

Settings on Toyota forklifts are highly adjustable as most parameters have eight or more levels of adjustment. Understanding how these settings affect forklift operation is the first step in realizing productivity and efficiency gains. Below are a few examples of settings that can be adjusted and how they can impact your operation. If you feel like you may benefit from optimizing your forklift’s parameters, please reach out to your local Toyota dealer for expert support and service.

Toyota Forklift Acceleration, Speed, and Braking Adjustments

Travel/Acceleration – These speeds can be adjusted to increase productivity or slow down forklifts for when precise handling is necessary. These settings can also provide energy savings in applications where quick acceleration or faster travel speeds are not necessary.

Accelerator Pedal Response* – Adjusts sensitivity to the initial depression of the accelerator pedal. Higher settings will reduce the delay between when the pedal is depressed and when the forklift begins to accelerate.

Rollback Speed* – Trucks with the rollback feature have a momentary delay followed by a controlled descent when the accelerator pedal is released while on a grade. This setting allows the travel speed and time before rollback to be adjusted.

Over Speed Alarm – An alarm sounds on the forklift when a pre-set travel speed is exceeded.

Regenerative Braking* – Adjusts how quickly the truck slows down when the operator’s foot is taken off of the accelerator pedal. Strength of “plugging” response can also be adjusted (when travel direction is switched between forward and reverse).

Toyota Forklift Lift, Maintenance, and Power Adjustments

Hydraulic Functions – Lift, lower, tilt, and attachment speeds are all adjustable. This includes starting, inching, maximum, acceleration, and deceleration settings. These settings can also provide energy savings in applications where faster hydraulic speeds are not necessary.

Lift Interrupt Level* – Used to tune the depth of discharge of a battery before the truck reaches lift interrupt. When the battery reaches the set level, the lift function will be disallowed. This allows the forklift to be matched to the battery size and type that is installed.

Planned Maintenance Hour Meter – An alarm sounds to inform the operator when the forklift is due for planned maintenance. The maintenance period can be adjusted and the alarm can be overridden.

Engine Auto Off/Auto Power Off – Engine (IC models) or battery power (electric models) will automatically turn off during a certain period of inactivity. The amount of time before it turns off can be adjusted or the setting can be turned off entirely.

*Applies to electric forklifts only.

Original Post: ToyotaForklift.com 


Mar 17

A Letter to Our Customers About the Coronavirus 


At Dillon Toyota Lift, the safety and well-being of our employees and customers is always a priority. We have a team dedicated to our response to the Coronavirus/COVID-19 situation and have established a business continuity plan to ensure the continuation of our services. We are closely monitoring updates from the Center for Disease Control and the World Health Organization regarding COVID-19. We will continue to seek guidance from these agencies and public health officials on an ongoing basis. 

As our employees interact with customers and the general public, we have taken steps to limit exposure to the virus. We are providing our employees with communication updates on preparedness planning and to remind them to take necessary precautions to ensure the safety and health of our communities, as follows: 

Infection-control measures recommended by the CDC to reduce transmission
Proactively monitor our employees’ health risks for illness or exposure
Encourage employees at risk or who may be symptomatic to not come to work
Identify travel risks and limit non-essential travel
Identify key personnel throughout key functions to continue to support our customers with products and services
Provide flexibility in work schedules and working remotely for those areas impacted
 
Please don’t hesitate to contact us with any concerns or additional requests that could arise from this unexpected situation. We will do our best to meet any extra needs and are willing to comply with your precautionary measures as well.  We appreciate the collective efforts taken by all to ensure everyone’s well-being. 
 
Thank you, 
John Dillon  
CEO/President 

Mar 12

The material handling industry is composed of limitless application varieties. Sure, you have your general industries such as cold storage or lumber where common elements are shared from location to location, but even within these environments you have differences that need to be accounted for. This includes different floor types, ambient temperatures, racking configurations, lighting conditions, and so much more. With all of these varying conditions, how can you find a forklift that will work for all of them? The answer is: you can’t.

This is why forklift options are so important and so prevalent in the material handling industry, because it gives you an opportunity to customize your forklift to fit your specific needs. If you’re in a cold storage environment, you likely need additional safeguards to protect against moisture and low ambient temperatures while a forging application is more concerned with how high ambient temperatures could damage hydraulic hoses and other components.

These deltas can even be boiled down to some of the simplest accessories such as forklift lights. With so many lighting options available, how do you know what’s best for your application? The following breakdown will help explain some of the different options out there and their benefits so that you can make a more informed opinion next time you speak with your local, authorized Toyota dealer.

Lighting Options

Bulb Types

Halogen Lights – Halogen lights use a typical bulb with a filament that can be damaged due to vibration or shock. They also have more amp draw than LED lights, meaning your battery will be drained faster which can reduce your runtime on battery powered forklifts. Halogen lights are cheaper than LED in most cases, meaning they will cost you less money upfront.

LED Lights – LED lights are more durable than halogen due to the lack of a filament, they don’t get as hot as halogen and they don’t have as much amp draw from the battery. LED headlight lenses are also typically made out of plastic instead of glass, which is ideal for companies that work with consumable goods. LED lights are typically more expensive, but could save you money over time due to less replacement cost and lower electricity bills for battery powered products.

Headlights

Standard Overhead Guard Mounted Headlights – Most forklifts with an overhead guard come standard with headlights mounted near the top of the overhead guard on the left and right overhead guard pillars. These lights can sometimes be modified or removed to be compatible with other options such as enclosed operator cabins.

Inset Headlights – Inset headlights are mounted further inward on the overhead guard and typically mounted to the top. Moving the lights inward within the confines of the overhead guard can better protect them from damage, but can also reduce the effectiveness of the lights since the mast can block some of the light being projected forward.

Low Profile Headlights – The headlights are have a narrower profile than the standard headlights, but are typically mounted in the same location. This allows them to be better protected without having to move them completely within the confines of the overhead guard. There are typically overhead guard mounted and mast mounted versions.

Front Combination Lights – Combination lights typically add additional functions to the standard overhead guard mounted headlights. This includes turn signal lights and parking/clearance lights.

Rear Work Lights

Rear Work Light – Rear work lights are mounted to the rear of the overhead guard and aimed behind the forklift. These are helpful for lighting the area behind the forklift, which is typically useful when travelling in reverse.

Low Profile Rear Work Light – A narrower work light is mounted on the rear overhead guard of the forklift and is typically mounted within the confines of the overhead guard to better protect it from damage.

Rear Combination Lights – This option rovides additional indicators on the rear overhead guard of the forklift. This typically includes back-up lights, stop/tail lights, and turn signal lights.

Specialty Lights

Strobe Lights – Strobe lights intermittently flash and are designed to help alert pedestrians and other operators of the forklift’s presence. They came in many different colors such as blue, red, amber, and clear and can also be mounted in different locations depending on the model.

Blue Spot Lights – Blue spot lights are usually mounted on the overhead guard of the forklift and aimed down at the ground in front of or behind the forklift. The distance the light is aimed away is up to the customer to determine based on the application. These lights are designed to help alert pedestrians and other operators of the forklift’s presence. In general, these can be more useful when entering and exiting aisles where the forklift and other lights may not be visible and where the color of the light stands out in the given environment. Also available in other configurations such as key-activated, travel direction-activated, and in different colors such as red.

Red Zone Light – These lights are mounted on the left and right side of the overhead guard and aimed at the ground by the customer, similar to the spot lights. They shine a red strip of light at the ground that is designed to alert operators and pedestrians to the forklift’s presence. In general, these can be more effective where the light stands out in the given environment.

Activation Types

Key On, Headlights On – The headlights are wired to the key switch and will turn on when the key switch is turned on. This is a helpful time saver for when headlights are frequently used such as when loading and unloading trailers.

Key Off, Headlights Off – Similar to the key on lights, this option only turns off the headlights when the truck is turned off. This is helpful to reduce amp draw on the battery. Leaving the lights on for a prolonged period of time can drain the battery to the point that the forklift will not start.

Key On, Key Off Lights – This option will automatically turn on all associated lights when the key is turned and will turn them all off when the forklift is turned off. The lights associated with this option may vary, contact your local, authorized Toyota dealer for more information based on your configuration.

Auto Lights Off (Oil Pressure) – Lights are turned off on the forklift automatically when the oil pressure reaches a predetermined level after the forklift is turned off. This ensures the lights are turned off even if the key is turned on, but the engine has not been started.

This list contains just a few of the options available today. Toyota is working to constantly develop new, innovative options and our team of expert engineers can even design custom solutions to work for you through our Toyota Special Design Request process. Be sure to contact your local, authorized Toyota dealer for more information regarding what is available and for helpful advice on what may be best for your specific environment.

Original Post: ToyotaForklift.com


Feb 28

The cost of a forklift is always more than the dollar amount you pay for it. Service and maintenance … repairs … downtime to complete maintenance and repairs … replacement parts. It all adds up.

At Toyota, we get it. And we’re committed to being your complete material handling partner throughout the entire life of your ownership — that’s the Toyota 360 Support Promise that comes standard on every Toyota Forklift you buy and allows you to take advantage of:

Toyota Certified Technicians
Toyota Genuine Parts
Toyota’s industry-leading standard warranty program
The Toyota Mobile Service app

But even with all of that, many customers find that they want even more peace of mind — a way to reduce the risk of maintenance emergencies and lower the cost of potential repairs even further.

Enter Toyota 360 Support Plus: an upgrade option that provides you a year of planned maintenance and an extended product assurance guarantee with the Toyota Extra Care Warranty program. It also allows you to add on the extra option of T-Matics support.

Both are fantastic plans that provide the most comprehensive support in the industry. But maybe you’re wondering: Is upgrading to Toyota 360 Support Plus right for you?

To get a recommendation specific to your operation — taking into account all of the variables and considerations of your usage and application — we recommend contacting Dillon Toyota Lift. But here is a good general guideline.

Upgrading to Toyota 360 Support Plus May Be Right for You If …

You have a large fleet to manage with a lot of moving pieces to keep on task and productive.
You would have a productivity disaster on your hands if even one of your forklifts needed repairs unexpectedly — and you want to minimize every possible risk.
You want extended product support assurance.
You don’t mind spending a little more up front in order to save a lot of time and money later.
You use telematics on your forklifts and want the added option of support for that technology.
You prefer to have things done on your timetable as much as possible.
You’d rather be proactive in preventing unexpected downtime emergencies than reactive in dealing with them when they arise.

Original Post: Shannon Potelicki, Content & Communications Copywriter, Toyota Material Handling


Feb 17

40% of all forklift accidents involve a pedestrian. Safety comes standard on all Toyota forklifts and we recommend that all operations follow safety best practices to help limit risk to operators and pedestrians in material handling settings. However, there are certain job sites in which alternative precautions for visibility make sense. Enter the Red-Zone LED Warning Light.  

Ensure pedestrians stay a safe distance away from the lift truck with the Red-Zone LED Warning Light. The Red-Zone emits a red beam on the floor to keep pedestrians away preventing foot injury or collisions from rear end swing. The Red-Zone LED Warning Light also includes mounting hardware.  Buy Now!


Feb 11

Electric vs. Internal Combustion Engine Forklifts

The great debate – electric forklifts versus IC (internal combustion) forklifts. This decision is not only for new companies. Established companies may also weigh the advantages and disadvantages of each fuel, especially if there is a shift of priorities to “go green.”

Electric Forklifts

The forklift industry has experienced a shift in sales, with electric forklifts now accounting for nearly 60% of the forklift market. Electric forklifts are rising in popularity due to advances in technology that are allowing them to operate more comparably to internal combustion engine forklifts in regards to performance and run time. The emergence of fast-charging capabilities, higher-voltage outputs, and new and improved battery, pump, and motor technologies are some of the reasons for these breakthroughs.

Electric forklift advantages include:

  • No exhaust emissions: Electric forklifts are powered by electrical energy sources such as batteries or fuel cells, which eliminates an employee’s exposure to potentially harmful exhaust emissions.
  • Reduced maintenance costs: Electric forklifts use no disposal waste (i.e. engine and transmission fluid) and a high percentage of battery lead can be recycled.
  • Operator ergonomics: Less noise and vibration is generated by the electric forklift, reducing operator fatigue.
  • Decreased repair costs: Electric forklifts have less moving parts to maintain and repair. AC motor technology further eliminates brushes to create no spark hazard and better speed control.
  • Lower long-term fuel costs: Batteries for the electric forklift can be recharged. Although the upfront costs for batteries and chargers can be expensive, the return on investment over time is typically higher than when using fuel.

With these advantages come other factors to consider. Although electric forklifts have lower lifetime fuel costs, the initial cost is higher. In addition to the cost of the battery, an area for charging, watering and cleaning must be arranged. Certain electric forklifts can be at a disadvantage when using the forklift in an outdoor application, depending on the design of the forklift. Many forklifts today, including Toyota’s 3-Wheel Electric and 80V Pneumatic models are designed to protect critical forklift components from potential damage due to water intrusion. Downtime can also be experienced if the battery is not charged or equalized properly.

IC Forklifts

The market is still strong for IC forklifts. They account for about 40% of the forklift market and are viable solutions for both indoor and outdoor applications.  IC forklifts tend to be more popular for outdoor, high-capacity applications and for specialty applications such as paper roll handling and container handling.

IC forklift advantages include:

  • Flexible application: IC forklifts are good indoors and outdoors. They operate well in rain and other inclement weather.
  • Multi-shift use: The fuel savings associated with electric forklifts is greatly diminished or negated when multiple batteries are required to keep an operation running. These batteries also take up additional space in a facility, reducing efficiencies and increasing operating costs.
  • Lower initial cost: On propane powered forklifts, only the investment of propane tanks and their storage area is needed to operate the forklift. Gasoline, diesel, and CNG powered forklifts are usually purchased when refilling stations are conveniently available. The infrastructure for these stations, however, can be very expensive if they don’t already exist at your facility.
  • Easy to refuel: IC forklifts running out of fuel do not require a lengthy charging period. An operator can easily replace the propane tank in 5 minutes and then continue production. Gasoline, diesel, and CNG powered forklifts can also be refueled in a matter of minutes depending on their location. This is especially important with a multi-shift operation.

Other factors to consider when purchasing an IC forklift include providing ventilation in the warehouse due to emissions, operator fatigue due to noise and vibration and the physical requirements of changing propane tanks. Finally, if the operation does not require an IC forklift you should consider the lifetime costs of maintenance, repairs and fuel cost when compared to an electric forklift.

LP vs. Gasoline vs. Diesel vs. CNG Powered Forklifts

Once you’ve made the choice to go with internal combustion engine powered forklifts for your operation, you now need to decide which fuel type is best for you.  The following tips should help to point you in the right direction.

Liquid Petroleum Gas (LP) – LP is ideal for customer locations that do not have gasoline, diesel, or CNG refilling stations readily available.  If you’re purchasing forklifts for a new facility, LP has the lowest initial cost since all you essentially need to purchase are LP tanks and a place to store them.  LP tanks can also be swapped in a matter of minutes, which can reduce your amount of downtime when refueling.  LP forklifts are available with both cushion and pneumatic tires and are ideal for both indoor and outdoor operations.

Diesel – Diesel fuel is highly efficient and can provide longer run times in general compared to other fuel types. One by-product of the combustion process with diesel is soot, which can accumulate in the exhaust system of a forklift and needs to be removed. Most Toyota forklifts are built with diesel oxidation catalysts so that this is slowly burned off over time, but there are some forklifts out there that use diesel particular filters that need to go through a manual regen process to burn away these deposits.  This can lead to more downtime since the forklift must be parked and not in use for the manual regen process to complete.  In general, diesel engines also have higher torque than their LP or gas counterparts, which can provide increased gradeability and acceleration. While fuel pricing is subject to change, diesel currently costs more per gallon than gasoline, providing a better return on investment over years of use. Diesel forklifts are generally only available with pneumatic type tires and are designed for outdoor use. This is mostly due to the fact that they are louder machines and produce more emissions than LP or gas powered forklifts.

Gasoline – Gasoline only powered forklifts are pretty rare in the material handling industry due to the popularity of dual fuel forklifts and the general lack of gasoline fueling stations, but they do serve a purpose. For customers that have refueling stations readily available, conveniently placed, and able to accommodate the size of their fleet, there is little reason to use LP or dual fuel configurations. Gasoline powered forklifts also do not have an LP tank and bracket on the back of the forklift, which can increase rearward visibility. They are also typically more powerful than their diesel alternatives and can provide increased travel and lift/lower speeds.

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) – Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) powered forklifts also require the appropriate refilling equipment in order to operate, but this type of fuel provides some distinct advantages. CNG is better for the environment and for overall air quality due to the fact that it produces less emissions and the natural gas dissipates into the air as water vapor and carbon dioxide in the event of a leak. Unlike LP forklifts, the CNG tank is never removed, but is actually refilled which can reduce downtime and operator strain. Infrastructure for CNG refueling stations, however, can be expensive due to the large amount of land required and general cost of equipment and installation. This, along with other barriers to entry such as obtaining the proper permits and having an adequate natural gas supply make CNG an unpopular choice in the current material handling market.


Feb 06

Toyota’s full line of equipment ranges from the small but sturdy hand pallet truck to the colossal beasts that make up our line of container handlers. Oftentimes, load capacity and application needs will determine the best type of material handling equipment you’ll need. But sometimes the decision may be a bit more subtle.

A Toyota Hand Pallet Truck (HPT) may be exactly what you need to get the job done for smaller applications – but a Toyota Electric Walkie Pallet Jack might work just as well. The load capacities between these two products aren’t much different. The HPT’s capacity weighs in at 5,500 pounds while the Electric Walkie maxes out at 4,500. How do you decide between the two?

Electric Pallet Jack vs. Manual Pallet Jack — Using a Toyota Hand Pallet Truck

While the HPT can lift a higher capacity than the Electric Walkie, heavier loads mean more exertion from the operator, making it better suited for shorter run times and quick material handling jobs. It’s an economical option whose size makes it highly versatile and ergonomic without any of the complexities of electrical wiring or battery maintenance. It’s a great fit for retail, cold storage, and general warehousing industries!

Electric Pallet Jack vs. Manual Pallet Jack — Using a Toyota Electric Walkie

The Electric Walkie takes the strain off the operator, making it ideal for mid-distance runs and ease of operation when working on trailers, dock plates, and ramps or slopes. An electric disc brake comes in handy when working on a grade where you may need to stop, and the anti-rollback system conveniently assists in keeping a load stationary during a transition from braking to moving. The HPT doesn’t have a similar system, meaning that the operator must maintain the stability of the load through physical exertion or sitting the load down. On a grade, the momentum can make this difficult.

A bit bigger than an HPT, this walkie is still a great fit for efficiently moving products through a warehouse and is designed with convenience in mind. Its drive motor makes it easier to navigate over dock plates and to both pull and raise loads, ideal for higher cycle applications.

Sometimes it’s the small things that make a big difference. If you’re not sure which product is the best match for your operation, feel free to reach out to Dillon Toyota Lift for more information.  

Original Post: Anastasia Sistevaris, Communications Copywriter, Toyota Material Handling, USA


Jan 31

With a wide range of maintenance checks that need to be performed on all forklifts, it can be easy to allow some part of your equipment fall out of OSHA or ANSI compliance. One aspect of fork inspection that can sometimes slip between the cracks is ensuring that forks are maintained appropriately in compliance with ANSI 56B (updated in May 2017).

In order to complete the appropriate checks and maintain fork compliance, you’ll need to make appropriate use of a fork caliper. This device can be used in three important ways to help you measure fork deviations and get the appropriate information to make sure you’re following the ANSI standard.

Fork Inspection: Check Fork Angle

fork inspection caliperfork inspection caliper

The Fork angle deviation must be within a margin of 3 degrees. That means that the angle between the blade and the shank must be between 87 and 93 degrees. To use the caliper to check this, open it and place it between the plate and shank so that all four protrusions are touching. The angle can be read using the marking on the caliper. Any fork angle that falls outside of the degree range must be tagged out until the forks are replaced.

Fork Inspection: Check Fork Hooks

fork inspection caliper

The numbers on the end of the caliper indicate the forklift classes. Use the appropriate protrusion to check if the fork hooks are in compliance. Simply place the protrusion into the hook notch. If the hook hits the back of the caliper, it is out of compliance. If it does not, then the forks are fine for continued use. The above fork is in compliance.

Fork Inspection: Check Fork Blade Wear

fork inspection caliperfork inspection caliper

Begin by setting the caliper by the thickness of the shank. Place the caliper onto the blade at the point of the fork that receives the most wear, which is usually at its heel, as shown. If the blade passes the inside teeth of the caliper, then the fork is out compliance and must be tagged out until forks are replaced.

Original Post: Jake Stewart, Digital Content Copywriter, Toyota Material Handling, USA


Jan 19

Did you know the forklift’s forks don’t directly connect to the mast? They actually attach to a support platform called the forklift carriage. The carriage is important because it is used to mount objects, including forks, the load backrest, and attachments, to the mast chains, allowing loads to go up and down the mast channel.

Selecting a forklift with a dependable carriage is vital to the safety of all those who work in material handling environments and for the long-term efficiency of your operation. Any place where parts of industrial machinery are attached sets and not one piece should be top-of-mind for the product’s durability. The first step in assessing the forklifts that are currently or may eventually be a part of your fleet is having a clear understanding of what each part implies for your operation. This guide will help you understand both carriage height and what that height implies for your potential lifting capacity.

Identifying Forklift Carriage Class

Understanding your forklift’s carriage class is important because it helps you understand what forks and objects will work with your forklift. There are five carriage classes. Each class can be determined by the distance between the top edge of the upper fork bar and the bottom edge of the lower fork bar. The carriage class also gives you a good idea for the lifting capacity of your forklift. Here is the carriage class guideline breakdown:

Class 1

Carriage height: 13”

Lifting Capacity: Less than 2,200 lbs.

Class 2

Carriage height: 16”

Lifting Capacity: Between 2,200 lbs. and 5,500 lbs.

Class 3

Carriage height: 20”

Lifting Capacity: Between 5,500 lbs. and 10,998 lbs.

Class 4

Carriage height: 25”

Lifting Capacity: Between 11,000 lbs. and 17,600 lbs.

Class 5

Carriage height: 28.66”

Lifting Capacity: Between 17,602 lbs. and 24,198 lbs.

Using this guide, you can ask informed question from Dillon Toyota Lift in order to make sure you get the best carriage for your operational needs. Understanding carriage class can also help you get a clear understanding of your fork and attachment capabilities Keep in mind that the carriage’s capacity is only one part of the equation when it comes to your forklift’s lifting capabilities. Always rely on your forklift’s data plate for accurate capacity information based on the entire configuration.


Jan 14

Let’s be honest. There are so many statistics and metrics involved with a forklift, it can be tough to understand what is what. There are tire types, mast types, various heights and dimensions that are all vital to know. Each of these needs consideration when considering what forklift is right for your operation.

One metric that is often overlooked is forklift free lift. A forklift’s free lift is the maximum height you can raise the forks without changing the mast height. There are two instances where this typically happens: when the inner mast rails extends past the outer mast rails or when the load backrest or carriage exceeds the height of the outer mast rails.

It is important to understand forklift free lift, especially if you are stacking or unstacking in confined spaces such as trailers, containers, and racking systems. These application have height restrictions and might cause product or equipment and possible safety concerns for operators or nearby pedestrians. There are two types of free lift a forklift can have: limited free lift or full free lift.

Forklift Free Lift – Limited Free Lift

When a forklift has limited free lift, it means that the inner mast rails will extend either immediately or shortly after lift is requested.  Limited free lift occurs with single-stage masts and two-stage masts with no free lift cylinder (see below on Full Free Lift). The amount of free lift can vary based on the condition and adjustment of the forklift’s lift chains as well as other factors such as fork thickness.

Forklift Free Lift – Full Free Lift

Full-free lift on a forklift means that the forks can be raised without immediately extending the inner mast channels. Full-free lift is available only on masts that have free lift cylinders. A free lift cylinder consists of a lift cylinder rod and assembly that is used to lift the carriage prior to the rear cylinders engaging.  This allows the carriage and forks to be lifted to a certain point prior to the inner mast rails. In many cases, you can get several feet of free lift depending on the mast design.

Full-free lift is helpful in areas where you need to lift a load, but have to be mindful of overhead obstructions.  Common areas where this is useful are for buildings with low ceiling heights and on trailers or box cars.

 

Original Post:  Kenny Trusnik, MArketing Systems & eCommerce Specialist, Toyota Material Handling, USA


1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 | Next